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Leaping Stag Weathervane

19,500.00
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Leaping Stag Weathervane

19,500.00

Damn, I wish I knew the noise a deer makes so I could write a clever description. Anywho, this is a wonderful vane with no apologies. Attributed to E.G. Washburne & Company, New York, circa 1880. Heavy custom made stand included because I’m generous like that when you spend thousands and thousands of dollars with me. 30” overall length; 27 1/2” overall height. Did you ever notice that a lot of the painted vanes you see are yellow or orange? Here’s my theory: farmer Joe spent a pretty sizeable chunk of 1880 change on this shiny deer weathervane, and some years later he looks up at the barn and it’s all green and dull. The gilt has worn away and the other farmers are making fun of him so he says you know what, I’m going to make it all bright and shiny like the day I bought it! He gets his weathervane down and lays a shiny yellow paint down over that verdigris surface and TA-DA good as new! A hundred and some years later, the result is a beautifully weathered yellow surface with that verdigris peeking out in spots.

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Damn, I wish I knew the noise a deer makes so I could write a clever description. Anywho, this is a wonderful vane with no apologies. Attributed to E.G. Washburne & Company, New York, circa 1880. Heavy custom made stand included because I’m generous like that when you spend thousands and thousands of dollars with me. 30” overall length; 27 1/2” overall height. Did you ever notice that a lot of the painted vanes you see are yellow or orange? Here’s my theory: farmer Joe spent a pretty sizeable chunk of 1880 change on this shiny deer weathervane, and some years later he looks up at the barn and it’s all green and dull. The gilt has worn away and the other farmers are making fun of him so he says you know what, I’m going to make it all bright and shiny like the day I bought it! He gets his weathervane down and lays a shiny yellow paint down over that verdigris surface and TA-DA good as new! A hundred and some years later, the result is a beautifully weathered yellow surface with that verdigris peeking out in spots.